Removing Derogatory Credit Information From Your Credit Reports

Removing derogatory credit information from your credit reports is the fastest thing you can do to raise your credit scores. Credit bureaus are known for the amount of inaccurate information in credit files, so check your reports regularly and be relentless in removing derogatory credit information in your files.

Start by getting a copy of your credit report. By law you may obtain a free copy of your credit report once a year from each of the three credit agencies: Equifax, Transunion, and Experian. You can request your report from each by locating them online. Or you can request a report from all three agencies at one time by sending your written request to the Annual Credit Report Request Service at PO Box 105281, Atlanta, GA, 30348.

Once you have copies of your credit report, examine each of them carefully for mistakes and errors.

Removing derogatory credit information in your files begins by disputing errors in your credit reports. Gather any supporting documentation you can find, such as credit card statements or canceled checks. You can dispute items in your credit report if you do not have documentation, but it's easier when you can back up your disputes with paperwork.

Write a letter to the credit bureau explaining why the deputed item is inaccurate, and include copies of your documentation. Hand write your dispute letter, or, write the letter on your computer. You will have much better success this way, versus using a ready-made dispute form you find on the internet. Be sure to send all communications by certified mail, return receipt requested.

Once the credit bureau receives your dispute letter, the bureau will request verification from the creditor. If the credit bureau does not receive notice back from the creditor in thirty days that your dispute has been denied, removing the disputed information from your report is automatic. You will receive a new copy of your report which will show the disputed item (s) removed.

Should the creditor deny your dispute, file again the following month. Be insistent that they verify your claim. Ask them to send you the name and phone number of the person that verified your claim so you may call them. You are entitled to know why they have denied your dispute and for what reason.

Credit bureaus are known for the amount of inaccurate information in credit files, so check your reports regularly and be relentless in removing derogatory credit information in your files. Removing derogatory credit information from your credit reports is the fastest way to raise your credit scores.

Source by Bob Pering

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